Troubleshooting

If you are having issues with fret buzz or getting a crystal clear tone, then something is wrong... Here is a Troubleshooting Guide that will help you self diagnose and solve 99% of all problems.  If your problem is not listed below or you need to contact us directly with a question, you can always contact us at support@thaliacapos.com

  

My guitar is not listed in your fretboard radius database

If your guitar is not listed in our fretboard radius database, then we recommend taking the following steps, it will just take a few minutes to find the right one:

Step 1:  Start with the 12" fretpad that is preinstalled on your capo...  Place it on your guitar on the 1st fret and see if you get buzzing on any strings.  If it sounds great with no buzzing then you are done, your guitar has a 12" radius.  But if you get buzzing on the low E string, then your guitar likely has a fretboard radius that is smaller than 12"; so change to the 10" fretpad and test again.  If there is still buzzing on the low E then drop it down again to the 9.5" and continue using this method until you find the one that works best.

If on the other hand, you are get buzzing on the D or G strings, then your guitar likely has a fretboard radius that is larger than 12"; so swap out the insert for the 15" and test again.  If there is still buzzing on the D or G, then increase the radius to the 16" or to the C(flat) and try again until you find the one that works best.  

Step 2:  If you still get buzzing on the 1st or 2nd fret; or no matter what fretpad you try, then you will need to use our XL fretpads. Certain guitars do require more tension than others.  These include guitars with thinner than average necks, guitars with compound radius fretboards, and 12-string or 8-string guitars with octave strings.   Please contact support@thaliacapos.com to get a free set of XL fretpads.

I tried the recommended fretpad but I am still getting buzzing

If you inserted the one listed in the database and are still getting buzzing, then we recommend taking the following steps, it will just take a few minutes to find the right pad.  Sometimes individual guitars can have radii that are different that what is published by the guitar maker and so this method will help you determine your guitar's actual radius:

Step 1:  Try the rubber fretpad with the same number.  Rubber is more compliant and some guitars are finicky with our teflon pads; if you are still getting buzzing then go onto Step 2.

Step 2:   Place the capo on the first fret and play each string.  If you get buzzing on the low E string, then your guitar likely has a fretboard radius that is smaller than the one installed; so change the fretpad to a smaller number.  If there is still buzzing on the low E then drop it down again and continue using this method until you find the one that works best.

If on the other hand, you are get buzzing on the D or G strings, then your guitar likely has a fretboard radius that is larger than the one installed; so swap out the insert for the next bigger one and test again.  If there is still buzzing on the D or G, then increase the radius again until you find the one that works best. 

Step 2:  If you still get buzzing on the 1st or 2nd fret no matter what fretpad you try, then you will need to use our XL fretpads. Certain guitars do require more tension than others. These include guitars with thinner than average necks, guitars with compound radius fretboards, and 12-string or 8-string guitars with octave strings.   Please contact support@thaliacapos.com to get a free set of XL fretpads sent right out to you.

The capo works great on the lower frets but starts to buzz as I go up the neck

If this happens, it is very likely that your guitar has a compound radius fretboard, this means that the fretboard flattens out the further up the neck you go.  You will need our XL rubber fretpads if you want a capo that works up and down the neck.  You can contact support@thaliacapos.com to get a free set of XL fretpads sent right out to you. In the meantime, if you frequently only capo on certain frets such as just on 1 and 2, you can use this method to find the fretpad that works best for that position:  

Step 1:   Place the capo on the desired fret and play each string.  If you get buzzing on the low E string, then change the fretpad to a smaller number.  If there is still buzzing on the low E then drop it down again and continue using this method until you find the one that works best.

If on the other hand, you are get buzzing on the D or G strings, then swap out the insert for the next bigger number and test again.  If there is still buzzing on the D or G, then increase the radius again until you find the one that works best. 

The capo works great on the upper frets but I get buzzing on the first fret

If you still get buzzing on the 1st or 2nd fret but it works great on upper frets, then you will need to use our XL fretpads. Certain guitars do require more tension than others, including guitars with thinner than average necks, guitars with compound radius fretboards, and 12-string or 8-string guitars with octave strings. Please contact support@thaliacapos.com to get a free set of XL fretpads sent right out to you.

It works great on my 6-string guitars but doesn't work on my 12-string

For 12-string & 8-string guitars we recommend the use of our XL Rubber fretpads, which are 2mm taller than the fretpads that come with every Thalia Capo.  This extra height increases tension to ensure that the octave strings on your guitar are fretted perfectly. Our teflon fretpads will probably not work on a 12-string or 8-string.

The capo moves when I hit it with my hand...  how can I keep this from happening?

Our teflon fretpads are slippery by design.  You can either switch to the rubber fretpads which are very secure and will not move.  Or if you like the tone and slide properties of the teflon pads, then maybe you are just placing the capo too close to the fret... 

Most guitarists are conditioned to place the capo as close to the fret as possible to avoid tuning issues. In fact, this is a best practice if you are using any other capo on the market... However, the Thalia Capo is different. Since the Thalia Capo has fretpads that match the fretboard radius of your guitar, it does not need to be placed that close to the fret to have perfect intonation. In fact, I often place the capo in middle of the fret or even slightly further back, giving you plenty of room to do B7 and other chords shapes where you might come in contact with the capo. The only exception to this rule is on fret 1, where the tension caused by the proximity to the nut requires you to move it a bit closer than the middle.