200 Series Upgrades

January 01, 2016 3 min read


Here is a list of some of the improvements that we made to the 200 series:

  1. Preloaded spring to make it easier to squeeze and create an over center feel
  2. Increased length of the capo cross bar to accommodate wider necks
  3. Increased length of all fretpads to accommodate wider necks
  4. Increased length of lever arm to improve leverage
  5. Moved fulcrum point to decrease amount of force required to squeeze capo
  6. Changed rubber neck pad so that it completely wraps around the pincher to eliminate the potential of scratching neck
  7. Improved the plating process by changing the thickness spec of various layers (extensive section cut testing of our plating processes was completed prior to the 200 series and so we also went to PVD process to allow us to use a 24k gold plate)
  8. Changed pincher opening profile to allow the capo to be stored above the nut
  9. Increased the clearance on either side of the pincher arm where it nests into the lever to ensure better clearance and no rubbing
  10. Changed from adhesive taped in fretpads to snap in place fretpads
  11. Reduced the profile height on all fretpads to reduce hand interference and allow the capo to be used on guitars with thicker necks
  12. Added a glued-in-place rubber compression spring to each fretpad to ensure a snug fit and a good snap after repeated use
  13. Changed the 7.5” radius fretpad to 7.25” to exactly match Vintage Fender radius
  14. Added a 9.5” radius fretpad to exactly match Modern Fenders
  15. Added a 10” radius fretpad to match Gibson guitars
  16. Changed 11.5” radius fretpad to 12” radius to exactly match Guild an other guitars
  17. Changed 13.5” fretpad to 15” to exactly match Taylor Guitars
  18. Changed 16.5” fretpad to 16” to exactly match Martin Guitars
  19. Added molded in numbering system to all fretpads
  20. Increased the width of fretpad channels to allow for easier installation of the fretpads by customers and eliminate the possibility of it being able to roll off when sliding
  21. Changed from molded zinc assembly pins to knurled stainless steel pins to ensure capo does not come apart after repeated use
  22. Changed rubber fretpads from all rubber to a 2 piece rubber and plastic bonded system so that you can snap in place rubber fretpadsjust like you can the sliding ones
  23. Changed press-fit adhesive to achieve an improved permanent bond
  24. Added 2 Teflon washers to the lever assembly to reduce rattle in lever arm during amp reverberation
  25. Changed length of torsion spring tines to improve long-term reliability of the spring
  26. Changed torsion spring geometry to improve longterm reliability and to ensure a consistent spring force throughout the range of motion
  27. Added a cavity arm in the front enclosure to better hold spring tines in place
  28. Changed hardening process for the spring to ensure better long-term spring force reliability
  29. Created a special spring testing jig to test each spring prior to assembly to keep spring angle tolerance to within +/- 1 degree vs. industry standard +/-5 degrees (ones outside of that tolerance are discarded)
  30. Changed zinc polishing process to improve seam matchup by creating a polishing jig to ensure that edges don’t get knocked down during polishing process
  31. Changed Teflon percentage in fretpads to increase tone and reduce string noise when sliding
  32. Improved adhesives used on wood and shell inlays to reduce possibility of delamination
  33. Improved inlay fit by creating a separate cutting profile for each inlay material to ensure better consistency across materials
  34. Upgraded to commercial laser cutter with higher tolerance and less burning of material to improve accuracy of cuts and overall appearance of inlays
  35. Changed flatness of inlay area to improve appearance and bonding strength of inlays



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